My Week in Books {1/9/20}

Screen Shot 2020-01-09 at 9.11.27 AM

I’m a day behind already and it’s only January 9th!

In case you missed them, here are some links to my recent posts:

Best of 2019 Posts:

What have you been reading (and loving) this week?

Last Week’s Reads:

Screen Shot 2020-01-09 at 9.42.29 AM

📖 Me by: Elton John (Henry Holt ) – Pub Date: October 15, 2019

It’s January 3rd and I’ve already found my first ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ read of the year!

I grew up listening to Elton John’s music in the background of my house on Sunday mornings. I can’t say I knew it was Elton John actually singing, it’s just a familiarity I had to his music when one of his songs played (let’s be honest, I still don’t know artists to some of my favorite songs 🤷🏼‍♀️). But who doesn’t know Tiny DancerBenny and the Jetts, Rocket Man…I could go on and on.

Anyway, my true love for Elton John came when he put on a concert in Laramie, Wyoming after the tragic death of Matthew Shepard. He played for hours in a tribute to Matthew Shepard and also in an effort to raise awareness to the inequality LGTBQ community experienced (and sadly, still does). He was incredible, playing for hours on end in the Arena Auditorium. I will never forget that night, not just for the concert he put on, but for the humbling experience that it was.

ME is the first and only autobiography available. In it, Elton John holds nothing back. He spills it all – from his horrifying parents to his drug use to juicy celebrity gossip to his beautiful family with David and their two sons. It is unflichingly honest, even when it makes himself look terrible. He was an addict and it made him treat some of the people closest to him poorly, but he checked himself into rehab and completely changed his life around, all while managing a career that has spanned over fifty years!

Also quite inspiring to me is Elton John’s work within the HIV/AIDS community. Since his nonprofit, Elton John AIDS Foundation, was started in the early 1990s, it has raised over $450 million dollars “to challenge discrimination against people affected by the epidemic, prevent infections, provide treatment and services, and motivate governments to end AIDS”.

He’s quite the individual and I will forever remain a loyal fan.

I also highly recommend the movie (which follows ME in the big areas), Rocket Man. It’s incredible in its own right as well!

📖 *** Dear Edward by: Ann Napolitano (The Dial Press) – Pub Date: January 6, 2019

This was my first selection of 2020 for #HWRbooks, my personal online book club I run through my Instagram page, @happiestwhenreading! The discussion post will go live on Saturday, January 25 and I’d love to have you join in the conversation!

The synopsis of this one pulled me in! It’s a coming-of-age story about a young boy who is the sole survivor of a plane crash. It examines the effects that accident and his grief then have on his teenage years.

For me, the book was too easy. I was looking for some serious examination of survior’s guilt and grief, but it lacked in these areas. I found many parts of the story unrealistic and I found myself continually hoping for more. One aspect I really liked was Edward’s relationship with Shay, a girl who lived next door from his aunt and uncle. She provided the grounding Edward needed to deal with his new circumstances.

The discussion post for Dear Edward will be up on January 25th, so I don’t want to go into too much more detail on my thoughts, so keep an eye out for it!

📖 *** Saint X by: Alexis Schaitkin (Celadon) – Pub Date: February 18, 2020

This one started off strong! I was really enjoying the island vibes and the mysterious disappearance that was reminiscent of Natalee Holloway, an 18-year-old woman that was in Aruba with others from her high school graduating class who disappeared in 2005 and has never been seen or heard from again.

Around the last 50% mark, the book slowed way down – which I don’t mind at all! I enjoyed the writing and I was completely invested in how the story was going to play out. Then around the last 25% of the book, it took a very unrealistic turn and the climax that was building throughout the story was completely disappointing. Because of that ending, I’m not entirely sure how I feel about the book overall…I’m going to have to let it be for awhile and see how it sticks with me over time.

(As a side note, I couldn’t help wondering how a book like this might make Holloway’s family feel. There are many similarities to her case and I think, as a mother, I wouldn’t enjoy this publication too much. Also, because this book really looks at the afterlives of a family after the disappearance of their loved one, this story would feel unsettling to me. If you’ve read it, what do you think about this aspect?)

Currently Reading:

Screen Shot 2020-01-09 at 9.44.04 AM

📱*** Such a Fun Age by: Kiley Reid (Putnam) – Pub Date: December 31, 2019

Just started this one but the buzz is everywhere!

My Week in Books {1/2/20}

After a hectic start to the Christmas Break, I’ve finally had a few days to chill out. Mostly I’ve missed having some time to read, so I’m excited to get as much of that in as I can!

Screen Shot 2020-01-01 at 5.14.08 PM

In case you missed them, here are some links to my recent posts:

Best of 2019 Posts:

What have you been reading (and loving) this week?

Last Week’s Reads:

Screen Shot 2020-01-01 at 5.16.50 PM

📱 The Song of Achilles by: Madeline Miller (Bloomsbury) – Pub Date: September 20, 2011 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

I loved Circe and had no idea that Miller had written a book prior to that one. Miller once again proves her storytelling abilities with this tale of the Greeks who go to Troy to save Helen, who was kidnapped by Paris. We also get a closer look into the life of Achilles and his romantic relationship with Petroclus. I wasn’t expecting a romance, but admist the battles and mythology, I was privvy to Achilles and Petroclus’ beautiful relationship. I really enjoyed this book, especially the last 100 pages or so. There were parts of this book that felt like a slog to get through, but I’m sure it has more with the timing (hello, Christmas break!) than the story itself. Miller truly has a gift for the retellings of mythology and I can’t wait for her next book which will be a retelling of The Tempest!

Currently Reading:

Screen Shot 2020-01-01 at 5.17.53 PM📖 Me by: Elton John (Henry Holt ) – Pub Date: October 15, 2019

Growing up, my mama loved Elton John. His music used to blare through the radio on Sunday mornings as breakfast was being cooked. For me, his music is comfort – reminiscent of a time where life was simple, easy, and happy…of when my mama was still alive. I could not wait to watch the movie, Rocketman, and after having done that, I immediately ran to my bookshelves and started reading his memoir, Me. I’m only a few chapters in, but I am loving this behind-the-scenes look into Elton John’s life.

Also, the movie is amazing! I would highly recommend it, right along with Bohemian Rhapsody!

(#partner #freebooks: All books noted by asterisks (***) indicate I received the book for free from the publisher, the author, or another promotional company to review. All opinions are my own.)

 

My Week in Books {12/26/19}

86C41BE2-F0FC-40B9-B922-EFF62353BD74
We took a helicopter ride when we were in Phoenix and this is just some of the beautiful scenery we saw on the flight!

I hope all of you had a wonderful Christmas with your loved ones yesterday. I hope Santa was good to you and you found lots of bookish goodness under the tree! We flew home from Arizona (yuck, I know…dealing with an airport on Christmas Day?!?!) and now my brother and nephew are visiting from Los Angeles.

It’s been busy, busy, busy this holiday season and I miss being able to curl up by a warm fire with a good book! Things will slow down around this time next week though…and I am already gearing up to make that vision my reality!

In case you missed them, here are some links to my recent posts:

What have you been reading (and loving) this week?

Last Week’s Reads:

Screen Shot 2019-12-24 at 3.58.41 PM

📖 The Stationery Shop by: Marjan Kamali (Gallery) Pub Date: June 18, 2019

This was a beautiful story that quite literally came full circle. Roya and Bahman met in Iran when they were only seventeen years old. They quickly fell in love and had plans of marrying, but a political coup in the area changed their plans. Instead, they lost touch when Roya moved to the United States with her sister to attend collge. There she met her husband, Walter, and lived a happy enough life. But Bahman was never far from her mind and when a chance encounter with his son brings them back together, the real story behind that fateful day is revealed.

I loved the simplistic nature of this deep and layered story. Kamali weaves a beautiful and lyrical story that completely captured me and took me by surprise. I’ve seen a lot of people that have named this book in their Top 10 Books of 2019 and it totally deserves that recognition. The characters were nuanced, as were their stories. It did feel a little slow in the beginning and quickly picked up speed as it neared the finish; I would have preferred a more even pace. Ultimately though, this was the perfect read with all the hustle and bustle of the current season.

Currently Reading:Screen Shot 2019-12-24 at 3.55.41 PM📖 Me by: Elton John (Henry Holt ) – Pub Date: October 15, 2019

Just starting this one but how could it be anything but good?

📱 The Song of Achilles by: Madeline Miller (Bloomsbury) – Pub Date: September 20, 2011

I’ve been waiting for this library hold to come in FOREVER, so I will be diving in shortly. I’ve read the first chapter just to get a feel for the story and I think it’s going to be a winner. If it’s anything like Circe, I’m in for a treat!

DNF (aka: Not For Me and/or Skipping For Now):

Screen Shot 2019-12-17 at 7.26.51 PM

*** 📖 Motherhood So White: A Memoir of Race, Gender, and Parenting in America by: Nefertiti Austin (Sourcebooks) – Pub Date: September 20, 2019

The part of the book I read was interesting, but I’m just not motivated to pick it up and read it anymore. I’m 33% in and she still hasn’t adopted her son and I’m just kind of over it. It feels more like an agenda than it does an adoption story at this point.

*** 🎧 Ordinary Girls by: Jaquira Díaz (Algonquin) – Pub Date: October 29, 2019

Skipping for now…I really liked it and I am interested in picking it up again, but with the holidays, the audiobook was too hard to follow.

(#partner #freebooks: All books noted by asterisks (***) indicate I received the book for free from the publisher, the author, or another promotional company to review. All opinions are my own.)

My Week in Books {12/18/19}

This time next week I envision a lot of you will be around the Christmas tree with your loved ones! I’ll be navigating an airport heading home from a non-snowy Christmas in Arizona. That doesn’t sound that exciting, but it’s totally worth it to get a quick couple of days in with my in-laws and then to get home just in time for my brother and nephew to arrive! It’s going to be a jampacked break and I can hardly wait!

What are your plans for the Christmas break?

In case you missed them, here are some links to my recent posts:

What have you been reading (and loving) this week?

Last Week’s Reads:Screen Shot 2019-12-17 at 7.24.08 PM

*** 📖 Recursion by: Blake Crouch (Crown) – Pub Date: June 11, 2019

I finally got to one of the buzziest books of the year and the winner of the 2019 Best Science Fiction Book in the Goodreads Choice Awards. I read and enjoyed Dark Matter a few years ago when it was released, so I was really looking forward to this one. The first (and most obvious) thing about Crouch’s books are that they’re absolutely mindblowing. His deep dives into scientific knowledge is way above my brain’s comprehension, but perhaps even more impressive, is his ability to relay this mindbending information in a way that’s (kind of) understandable. I liked this look into False Memory Syndrome and its implications for humankind. It wasn’t a total page turner for me (like Dark Matter was), but it was still a very enjoyable reading experience.

📱 So You Want To Start a Podcast: Finding Your Voice, Telling Your Story, and Building a Community That Will Listen by: Kristen Meinzer (William Morrow) – Pub Date: August 6, 2019

I borrowed this book from the library because I was curious about the podcasting process. I am in awe of people that have the technological skills to manage something like this (I can barely run this blog! 😂), and are able to come up with fresh and new content on a regular basis. This book breaks the process down really well, but I am now certain I am not cut out to be a podcast creator! Thank goodness for people like Sarah who do the meaningful work for the rest of us!

*** 📖 All That You Leave Behind by: Erin Lee Carr (Ballantine) – Pub Date: April 9, 2019

It only seemed appopriate to start this one on what would have been my sweet mama’s 65th birthday. I really enjoyed Carr’s writing style and love that she had so many pieces of advice from her father in her emails and text messges. I’ve come to realize that you can never have enough of these tidbits from your loved one. This book totally reminded me of Claire Bidwell Smith’s book, The Rules of Inheritance, which I read a few years ago. Many people really loved this book when it came out, and while I can really appreciate the tremendous loss of a parent, I found myself sort of skimming the book towards the end.

*** 📱/📖 I’m Not Dying With You Tonight by: Kimberly Jones (Sourcebooks) – Pub Date: August 6, 2019

Mostly I just gotta clear this one off my Netgalley shelf and it does seem like it’ll be a quick and easy read. I’m not super far into it, but it’s about a shooting that breaks out at a high school football game and the rest of the events that ensued thereafter. I really wanted to appreciate this as the YA novel it was, but it totally didn’t work for me. There was just way too much going on – a school shooting, a homeless person that pursues these two girls, AND a city-wide riot? There were too many storylines for the authors to do any justice to any of them. Also, while there are shots being fired, one of the girls was much more concerned with why her boyfriend wasn’t answering her phone calls. Is her cheating on her?! None of it made sense…neither girl was demonstrating the emotions I would expect from people who are fearful for their lives. I can’t even dismiss these issues as part of the YA genre – it just wasn’t very well written.

Currently Reading:

Screen Shot 2019-12-17 at 7.26.51 PM

*** 📖 Motherhood So White: A Memoir of Race, Gender, and Parenting in America by: Nefertiti Austin (Sourcebooks) – Pub Date: September 20, 2019

I heard Austin talk about her book on the KERA Think Podcast (“All She Wanted Was To Be a Single Black Mother”) and I was instantly intrigued. I’m only about 10% in, but I’ve learned a lot about family culture in Black families and communities.

*** 🎧 Ordinary Girls by: Jaquira Díaz (Algonquin) – Pub Date: October 29, 2019

Still making my way through this one. I like it, but I’m just not listening to audiobooks a lot right now. They’re requiring more focus than I’m able to give. I may try to check this one out of the library instead…

DNF (aka: Not For Me):

Screen Shot 2019-12-17 at 9.30.04 AM*** 📖 Africaville by: Jeffrey Colvin (Amistad) – Pub Date: December 10, 2019

I was confused by the discombobulated timeline and decided to DNF it around the 40% mark. This really could be a case of wrong timing for me as I’ve struggled lately to find a book that holds my attention.

 

(#partner #freebooks: All books noted by asterisks (***) indicate I received the book for free from the publisher, the author, or another promotional company to review. All opinions are my own.)

My Week in Books {12/11/19}

In case you missed them, here are some links to my recent posts:

Also, don’t forget about my Gift Giving Guide for the Bookworms in your life!!

What have you been reading (and loving) this week?

Last Week’s Reads:

Screen Shot 2019-12-11 at 7.18.10 AMThe Starless Sea by: Erin Morgenstern (Doubleday) – Pub Date: November 5, 2019

This book took me F O R E V E R to get through, especially the last 100-150 pages! The first 300 pages were interesting and held my attention (though it required A LOT of effort on my part to keep the various storylines straight. The book was a solid 4 star read for me up until I hit the wall around 350 pages. It pains me to say, but I feel like I’m being generous even giving this 3 ½ stars at this point.

There are enough similarities to The Night Circus to allow me to recognize that this is the same author. Morgenstern is masterful at creating atmospheric reads, and for that reason alone this book sustained my attention. I get so fully immersed in these worlds Morgenstern creates and there’s a part of me that wishes these places were a reality. I also loved Morgenstern’s ode to lit lovers – the references to books and authors and reading were absolutely wonderful. But the interwoven stories and characters proved to be a lot to remember and eventually the payoff for that effort started to dwindle.

Ultimately, this book won’t be for everyone. It just demands too much from the reader and I fear it’ll be very polarizing – you’ll either love it or hate it. Maybe with some tighter editing it would be a bit more successful, but I’m so sad to say that this was more a miss than a hit for me. If you’re curious about Morgenstern and her creative genius, choose The Night Circus (my review here) over this one!

Opioid, Indiana by: Brian Allen Carr (SoHo Press) – Pub Date: September 17, 2019

I picked this one up strictly on the looks of the cover…so let’s just say I didn’t get what I was expecting. Honestly, I thought it was going to read like Dopesick by Beth Macy. Umm…😂😂😂. Not even close!

It’s a YA book about a seventeen-year-old who lives with his drug-addicted uncle in the Midwest. It’s goes deeper than just looking at the drug epidemic of present day, and quite honestly, it’s a little depressing. It explores many issues – Trump, school shootings, texting, and drugs – but it’s really a coming-of-age story for the main character, Riggle. His voice is authentic and, had it not been for him, I would have DNF’d this one. There’s a side ‘fable’ of how the days of the week got their name and I hated that part…I’m sure there’s some underlying, metaphorical reason for including it, but I did not enjoy it. Overall, I think this one missed its mark for me…but I could see (older) teenage boys enjoying it.

Currently Reading:

Screen Shot 2019-12-11 at 7.20.00 AM*** Recursion by: Blake Crouch (Crown) – Pub Date: June 11, 2019

Yesterday, I posted about The Top 5 Books I Didn’t Get to in 2019, and this book was on the list. Maybe just pulling it off my shelf was all the motivation I needed because I started it yesterday!I’m twenty pages in…and hooked!

*** Africaville by: Jeffrey Colvin (Amistad) – Pub Date: December 10, 2019

I had to step away for a minute. Unfortunately this one calls for a review, so I’ll have to come back to it, but I would definitely DNF it if I were reading for pleasure. Because it’s multi-generational and the timelines jump around A LOT without any real explanation, it’s pretty confusing to keep the story straight or to forge any connection to the story. I’m hoping it comes together in a more cohesive way soon! 🤞🏼

🎧 *** Ordinary Girls by: Jaquira Díaz (Algonquin) – Pub Date: October 29, 2019

Still making my way through this one. I like it, but I’m just not listening to audiobooks a lot right now. They’re requiring more focus than I’m able to give. I may try to check this one out of the library instead…

 

(#partner #freebooks: All books noted by asterisks (***) indicate I received the book for free from the publisher, the author, or another promotional company to review. All opinions are my own.)

My Week in Books {12/4/19}

The countdown to Christmas is on. I think something must be wrong with me because I am NOT IN THE MOOD AT ALL. I had to force myself to put the Christmas tree up (and it may or may not only be halfway done…STILL!) and I haven’t done ANY shopping yet. I don’t know what’s wrong with me, but I hope I find the Christmas cheer soon!

Here’s a rundown of my recent posts that you may have missed:

What have you been reading (and loving) this week?

Last Week’s Reads:Screen Shot 2019-12-04 at 11.06.33 AM

Nothing to See Here by: Kevin Wilson (ECCO) – Pub Date: October 29, 2019

I’m a little on the fence about this one. I enjoyed it – it’s one of those feel good books that are always nice once in awhile. There’s sarcasm and snark which I loved, and the characters were seriously endearing. But overall it fell flat for me. I was sold on the book when I heard that the kids catch fire, but honestly? That part of the book was super disappointing to me. I wanted to explore that aspect so much more, and for a book where that’s supposedly the main point, it felt like an afterthought. This would make a great choice when your life is busy and overwhelming (like now) because it doesn’t take a lot of brain power to get through, but, for me personally, it was more of a miss than a hit.

Currently Reading:

Screen Shot 2019-12-04 at 11.05.34 AMThe Starless Sea by: Erin Morgenstern (Doubleday) – Pub Date: November 5, 2019

This book d e m a n d s that the reader slooooooows way down in order to fully appreciate what Morgenstern is trying to do here. So far, I’ve seen a lot of mixed reviews and the criticism I see the most is that it’s confusing and hard to follow. So, take my advice: slow down and give this book your full attention. The world building is amazing (just like The Night Circus), but Morgenstern’s descriptive writing is where the similarities end!

🎧 *** Ordinary Girls by: Jaquira Díaz (Algonquin) – Pub Date: October 29, 2019

Just started this one too, and I am really enjoying it!

DNF (aka: Not For Me):Screen Shot 2019-12-04 at 11.10.49 AM

*** 🎧 Get a Life, Chloe Brown by: Talia Hibbert (Avon) – Pub Date: November 5, 2019

This one isn’t going bad; in fact, I enjoy the narrator A LOT. The reality is that I’m not a huge fan of the romance genre, and I’ve read so many this year that I’m kind of over it. This one is also giving me Eleanor Oliphant vibes and I HATED that book…so for now, I’m quitting in an effort to read some other big 2019 books I’d still like to get to! DNF @ 18%.

*** 🎧 The Deep by: Rivers Solomon (Gallery/Saga Press) – Pub Date: November 5, 2019

I’m just confused enough to quit trying. It’s short enough I contemplated pushing through, but I just can’t find the motivation. DNF @ 40%.

Save Me the Plums: My Gourmet Memoir by: Ruth Reichl (Random House) – Pub Date: April 2, 2019

Ugh…I’m b o r e d. Maybe I don’t appreciate food enough!? 🤷🏼‍♀️ DNF @ 22%.

(#partner #freebooks: All books noted by asterisks (***) indicate I received the book for free from the publisher, the author, or another promotional company to review. All opinions are my own.)

My Week in Books {11/27/19}

On a whim I decided to create a 2019 Gift Giving Guide for Bookworms…if you haven’t had a chance to check it out, please do! It was a lot of fun for me to create and I hope you get some good ideas! I know I’d be happy to have a stocking stuffed with these gifts.

IMG_4924

Nonfiction November has come to a wrap and this year went better for me than last year. I tried to add some fiction reads into the month and I think that saved me from getting burned out. Here are the links to my posts:

What have you been reading (and loving) this week?

Last Week’s Reads:Screen Shot 2019-11-26 at 8.41.54 AMThe Friend by: Sigrid Nunez (Riverhead) – Pub Date: February 6, 2018

“What we miss—what we lose and what we mourn—isn’t it this that makes us who, deep down, we truly are.”

While I went into this book pretty blind, I thought it had something to do with grief and a dog…sounds like a perfect read for me during the month of November. And while a lot of that is definitely true, I didn’t realize it also talked a lot about writing and telling our stories. This was a pleasant surprise to me! This book seems to be polarizing – one either seems to love it or hate it. I fall directly in the middle (probably ⭐️⭐️⭐️💫)…there were parts I liked (the writing is seriously beautiful at times, I loved the dog!, and I loved the twist), but there were also parts that didn’t work for me (for a book about a friend’s death and his dog, there was an awful lot of talk about writing).

I’m glad I finally read this one, but it won’t make my all-time favorites list. Having said that, now knowing the twist towards the end, my curiosity it certainly piqued and I think I’ll try to reread it in the future so I can read the text through that lens.

Know My Name by: Chanel Miller (Viking) – Pub Date: September 24, 2019

Hands down, THE MOST IMPORTANT BOOK I’VE READ THIS YEAR! And just to join in with everyone else: this book needs to be added to high school curriculum and every single mama (of girls AND boys) needs to read this. Miller writes from a place of raw emotion and she exposes a flawed system that protects rape culture and the perpetrators that cross boundaries. Our society is in a place where it can really make some impactful changes for the good, and this book highlights several of those places. Miller was gentler on Turner than I would have been and it just makes her message that much more powerful. Getting a glimpse into the emotional turmoil a survivor has to go through – especially when she is more scrutinized than the assailant – broke my heart. I understand the importance of being “innocent until proven guilty”; however, when the survivor’s life is so much more dissected – especially with the amount of proof the authorities had in this case – there’s a serious problem with the overall system and culture surrounding rape, white privilege, and validating women who bravely come forward.

*** Long Bright River by: Liz Moore (Riverhead) – Pub Date: January 7, 2020

My first book of 2020 already in the books! Immersed in a world of addiction and mysterious disappearances of street girls, Mickey searches for her missing sister, Kacey. Alternating between past and present, we gain a full understanding of what the sister’s to their current place. With a few twists and turns (some I saw coming and others I didn’t), I think this was almost more of a literary mystery than thriller. It was nuanced and thought-provoking and I think it’s going to be a hit this winter!

Currently Reading:Screen Shot 2019-11-26 at 8.46.19 AMNothing to See Here by: Kevin Wilson (ECCO) – Pub Date: October 29, 2019

Recommended by my girl, Sarah from Sarah’s Book Shelves (regardless of our #booktwinness, Sarah will always be my girl! 😘), I grabbed this one from my Book of the Month box (Sarah was the judge, y’all!! 😱). I’m not super far into it, but it’s going to be a quick, easy, and entertaining read!

*** 🎧 Get a Life, Chloe Brown by: Talia Hibbert (Avon) – Pub Date: November 5, 2019

I knew this one wouldn’t work for me in print (it has too many Eleanor Oliphant vibes for me), but I have to admit: this one is an absolute delight in audio! I am LOVING the narrator, especially when she’s “Gigi”!

*** 🎧 The Deep by: Rivers Solomon (Gallery/Saga Press) – Pub Date: November 5, 2019

I’m not absolutely certain how I feel about this one yet. I’m about halfway through and had to take a break because it’s deep and sometimes hard to listen to due to the premise. I am fascinated by the story so I’ll continue, but I’m not quite sure just yet.

DNF (aka: Not For Me):

Screen Shot 2019-11-19 at 10.13.04 AM

*** Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-Delusion by: Jia Tolentino (Random House) – Pub Date: August 6, 2019

I’m so sorry, but I just can’t. This one was threatening to send me into a reading slump – a sure sign that I need to walk away. I liked what I read and think I’ll hang on to this one for awhile in hopes that I pick it up again. I’m just not sure I was in the right head space to appreciate this one.

🎧 Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by: J.K. Rowling (Pottermore) – Pub Date: November 20, 2015

Ehh. I LOVE HP, but I’m just not feeling this right now.

(#partner #freebooks: All books noted by asterisks (***) indicate I received the book for free from the publisher, the author, or another promotional company to review. All opinions are my own.)