My Week in Books (10/10/19)

My husband celebrated a birthday this week and I was reminded (again) how lucky I am to have such a wonderful person to share life’s adventures with. Next year, we will have spent more life TOGETHER than separately and I can’t wait to reach that fun milestone!

As the weather here in Colorado is quickly changing (this morning was pleasant and warm; it is now blowing 30 mph and the wind has a bite to it. They say we may wake up to some snow…and I’m not ready!), I’m thinking of all the cozy reading days I hope are in my near future. You know the kind: where it’s cold as heck outside, so you snuggle up with a warm cup of tea, a blanket, and a good book by the fire to pass the day away. I can’t wait!

What have you been reading (and loving) this week?

Last Week’s Reads:Screen Shot 2019-10-09 at 7.00.25 PMThe Turn of the Key by: Ruth Ware (Simon & Schuster) – Pub Date: August 6, 2019

I found Ware’s other books, The Woman in Cabin 10 and In a Dark, Dark Wood, just ok, but I believe she found her stride with this one. It’s just weird enough that I kept turning the pages to see what would happen next. From the giant estate with cameras always watching, to the locked closet and poison garden, the setting alone provided just enough intrigue to weave a creepy story. Admittedly, the ending was a bit of a letdown after the buildup, but I also feel like this happens often with this genre. I’ve come to expect that it’s never going to be as crazy as it should be, so I’m fine with how this one ended.

The Dutch House by: Ann Patchett (Harper) – Pub Date: September 24, 2019

“We overlay the present onto the past. We look back through the lens of what we know now, so we’re not seeing it as the people we were, we’re seeing it as the people we are, and that means the past has been radically altered.”

What I absolutely loved about this novel was the relationship between Maeve and Danny. Books are written all the time about sibling relationships, but none quite like this. It was a true bond and the sacrifices they made for each other (mostly that Maeve made for Danny) were so beautifully portrayed. In a situation that could have easily torn them apart, they remained close and bound together.

I also loved the secondary characters…in all their humanness. They were vile and nasty (I’m looking at you, Andrea), but also redeemed by the time it was all said and done. Sandy, Jocelyn, and Fluffy also stood out to me as examples of love (unconditional and otherwise) and acceptance. Also, to me, the house itself – The Dutch House – was its own beautiful character. It was the silent observer to these significant events and continued to bear witness to the lives of all the characters over the years. In its solidity and silence, it offered its comfort and steadfastness…sort of a calming force in the chaos of everyday life.

Basically, this book reiterated to me that we don’t always know the reasons behind someone’s choices and/or behavior. There are layers and layers to people and it’s best to learn forgiveness in order to have the freedom to enjoy your own life. The past can dig into you and refuse to let you go. The only way to counteract that is to forgive, and maybe more importantly, forget.

*** Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know About the People We Don’t Know by: Malcolm Gladwell (Little Brown) – Pub Date: September 10, 2019

I listened to Gladwell on The Bill Simmons Podcast and I immediately moved this one to the top of my TBR. I don’t know…I always love Gladwell’s books, and though he does a thorough job of dissecting tough topics, I also always feel…confused? Like, don’t ask me to summarize what I read because I really don’t know. But I liked it. Will I remember it? Probably not. But I liked it. Does anyone else feel this way about Gladwell’s books?!

American Royals by: Katharine McGee (Random House) – Pub Date: September 3, 2019

Hmm…I enjoyed this book a lot and thought it paralleled nicely to Red, White, and Royal Blue (my review here), but I was angry when I read the last page and realized this is part of a series. I would never had picked it up had I known that…I don’t do series, and when I do, I only do when I know what I’m getting into. It was a totally cliffhanger ending and I won’t know how this all sorts out until Fall of 2020. This is probably just me…but I’m irritated. I don’t know what to say other than that…good book, but don’t read it if you had continuing stories, like me. The real question now is if I’ll pick up the next book next year or just ask all of you for the gist. 🤷🏼‍♀️

Currently Reading:

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After the End by: Clare Mackintosh (Putnam) – Pub Date: June 25, 2019

My library hold came in for this one and I’ve read about 20%. So far, it has a lot of Jodi Picoult vibes…I’m not sure if I’m here for it yet or not. A couple years ago, I burned myself out on Jodi Picoult novels – I could not get enough of them! – so I’m hesitant, but curious. A lot of my trusted sources have enjoyed this one, so I’m going to keep going.

(#partner #freebooks: All books noted by asterisks (***) indicate I received the book for free from the publisher, the author, or another promotional company to review. All opinions are my own.)

October TBR (aka: Hopefuls)

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Another month, another TBR!

*** Talking To Strangers: What We Should Know About the People We Don’t Know by Malcolm Gladwell (Little Brown) – Pub Date: September 10, 2019

I listened to Gladwell on The Bill Simmons Podcast (thank you, Sarah, for the recommendation) and immediately moved this book up on my TBR.

The Sweetest Fruits by Monique Truong (Viking) – Pub Date: September 3, 2019

I have loved all my subscription picks from Book Are Magic so far, so why not?

The Dearly Beloved by Cara Wall (Simon & Schuster) – Pub Date: August 13. 2019

This is my pick for my #HWRbooks buddy read. I’d love to have you join! Also, Katie, Susie, Sarah and Catherine loved it, and since they’re my #bookishtwins, I’m in!

How To Make Friends With the Dark by Kathleen Glasgow (Delacorte Press) – Pub Date: April 9, 2019

Ashley Spivey said this one portrays grief well, so I immediately bought it. It’s taken me awhile to pick up because I’m worried about my emotions, but I think it’s time.

Stars of Alabama by Sean Dietrich (Thomas Nelson) – Pub Date: July 9, 2019

From my Bookshelf Subscription a few months ago, I really want to get to this one! It looks so good!

*** Cantoras by Carolina De Robertis (Knopf) – Pub Date: September 3, 2019

Lupita raved about this one so I listened to the The Reading Women podcast with the author and immediately knew I had to read it! I cannot wait!

The Dutch House by Ann Patchett (Harper) – Pub Date: September 24, 2019

You’re living under a rock if you haven’t heard about this one. And I have yet to see a meh or negative review, so I had to pre-order this one! This book is the followup to the book that’s taken the world by storm, The Handmaid’s Tale! Also, after the Amazon fiasco, I had to buy it from and independent bookstore (shout out to Tattered Covered Bookstore) to help its sales!

The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware (Simon & Schuster) – Pub Date: August 6, 2019

The book I’m the most leery about this month. Ware can be hit or miss for me, so I initially passed on this one. But I keep seeing amazing reviews, so I decided to give it a shot!

(#partner #freebooks: All books noted by asterisks (***) indicate I received the book for free from the publisher, the author, or another promotional company to review. All opinions are my own.)

My Week in Books {10/2/19}

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October 1st arrived and finally brought some fall weather with it! I’m not sure it got over 50 degrees yesterday and it was fantastic! Perfect reading weather!

Also with the beginning of October, I’m starting to feel the pressure of all the books that have come out this year that sound wonderful that I haven’t found the time to read yet. It feels like if I don’t get to them this year, I probably won’t get to them at all. Does anyone else feel that way?

Because of that self-imposed pressure, I feel a lot of DNFs coming on. If a book isn’t jiving with me, I’m moving on! #sorrynotsorry

What have you been reading (and loving) this week?

Last Week’s Reads:Screen Shot 2019-10-02 at 11.59.33 AM

The Most Fun We Ever Had by: Claire Lombardo (Doubleday) – Pub Date: June 25, 2019

I saw this one all over #bookstagram and I was hesitant to give into the hype…but man, I wish I had sooner because THIS BOOK IS EVERYTHING! With a full cast of characters, there’s a ton of dysfunction and complicated relationships, but ultimately, I loved each and every one of them (albeit differently). Sometimes the snark and dysfunction was a little over the top; however, one thing I learned from the Sorensons is that we all carry pain differently. It’s easy to look in from the outside and judge another person’s story, but until you’ve walked the same path, you truly don’t know how you would react or behave. I also realized that compassion and forgiveness are key components of a healthy relationship. There is no doubt in my mind that this one will make my Top 10 for 2019!

*** The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9/11 by: Garrett M. Graff (Avid Reader Press) – Pub Date: September 10, 2019

Kind of like WWII fiction, I will read anything that has to do with 9/11. I knew instantly that this was a book I wanted to read and I’m so grateful for the opportunity to absorb the survivors’ and heroes’ stories from this day through yet another oral history book. Much like Fall and Rise (which I read and LOVED earlier this year; review here), Graff compiled tons of interviews, audio clips, and personal accounts. What’s slightly different about this book is that there was additions from more political people – specifically, Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, among others – which added a whole new perspective to that day. I highly encourage you to pick this one up and continue to honor the heroes of that day and #neverforget.

The Day the World Came to Town: 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland by: Jim DeFede (William Morrow) – Pub Date: September 3, 2002

(I’m on a 9/11 kick, if you can’t tell.) I was so curious about this town in Newfoundland that found their town suddenly hosting passengers from America-bound flights that couldn’t land due to the flight restrictions placed shortly after the events of 9/11 started. They graciously hosted almost 7,000 people by opening up their homes, their stores, and their restaurants. They refused to accept any money from the stranded passengers – their only goal was to make them feel safe and as comfortable as they could. I was inspired by their hospitality and it gave me hope that this world isn’t as dark as it can sometimes seem.

How To Make Friends with the Dark by: Kathleen Glasgow (Delacorte Press) – Pub Date: April 9, 2019)

My hopes and expectations were especially high for this one because it deals with grief after losing a mother. Also for that reason, it took me awhile to pick this one up (I bought the book in April). Sadly, this one was a miss for me. I very much preferred Glasgow’s previous book, Girl in Pieces, and that may have interfered with my overall feelings of this one. It just never reached its stride for me. It was enjoyable enough, just not something that will stand out for me in the long run.

Currently Reading:Screen Shot 2019-10-02 at 12.01.18 PM

The Turn of the Key by: Ruth Ware (Simon & Schuster) – Pub Date: August 6, 2019

I started this one last night and have barely got thirty pages in, but so far, I’m definitely intrigued. I’ve read a few books by Ware (In a Dark, Dark Wood and The Woman in Cabin 10) and they very much fell in the meh category for me. However, so far, this one feels different and I’m excited to keep reading!

DNF (aka: Not For Me):

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*** On Swift Horses by: Shannon Pufahl (Riverhead) – Pub Date: November 5, 2019

This book has hope and promise and I may revisit in hard copy someday. But as for now, I couldn’t get into it at all. Just because I love the cover and the premise so much, I forced myself to keep trying, but I’m finally throwing in the towel at 22%.

*** 🎧 Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee by: Casey Cep (Knopf) Pub Date: May 7, 2019

This is a case of me and NOT the book. I’m just having a hard time concentrating on audiobooks (even podcasts, for that matter) at this point in time. I got through Part One which was fascinating and addictive. I will more than likely revisit this one in the future when my attention span is a little bit better!

(#partner #freebooks: All books noted by asterisks (***) indicate I received the book for free from the publisher, the author, or another promotional company to review. All opinions are my own.)

September 2019 Wrap-Up

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I definitely had some highs and lows in my reading life in August. Here’s my Wrap-up by the numbers:

  • 13 books total (5 DNFs)
  • Average Rating: 3.7
  • 6 physical books, 7 e-books, 0 audiobook
  • 10 fiction, 3 non-fiction
  • Genre: 1 contemporary fiction, 5 literary fiction, 2 historical fiction, 0 memoir, 3 non-fiction, 2 thriller, 0 young adult
  • Rating: 4 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️, 2 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️, 2 ⭐️⭐️⭐️💫, 3 ⭐️⭐️⭐️, 2 ⭐️⭐️
  • Author: 9 female, 4 male, 0 they/them

So far this year, I’ve read 127 books and my average rating is a 3.9 (I’d like to see this number a little higher).

My favorite books of the month were The Most Fun We Ever Had, After the Flood, and The Only Plane in the SkyThese three books were so good, in their own way. They offer something completely different and it was too hard to narrow it down to one.

Here’s the complete breakdown. (Click on the link to be taken to my original review).

Complicated Issues/Relationships:

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 📖 The Most Fun We Ever Had by: Claire Lombardo (Doubleday) – Pub Date: June 25, 2019

I LOVED this family saga – full of family drama, secrets, and complicated relationships. The character development was phenomenal and I felt like the Sorensons were a real family. This book reads like a Netflix series (think This Is Us and Parenthood). I won’t forget this family for a long time!

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 📖 *** The Goldfinch by: Donna Tartt (Little Brown) – Pub Date: October 22, 2013

This was a reread for me and I liked it even more the second time around. If it wouldn’t have been for a few places where the pace slows way down, it would be a 5-star read for me. The cast of characters really stick with you. This is ultimately a coming-of-age book and I really enjoyed it. (P.S. The book is better!😉)

⭐️⭐️⭐️💫 📱 Red at the Bone by: Jacqueline Woodson (Riverhead) – Pub Date: September 17, 2019

The audiobook version of this one is excellent. I enjoyed it while I was reading it, but I’m not sure it’s going to be a story that sticks with me.

WWII Historical Fiction:

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️📱 *** The World That We Knew by: Alice Hoffman (Simon & Schuster) – Pub Date: September 24, 2019

This is the third book that I’ve read by Alice Hoffman. While this one strays a little from the previous two I read (The Rules of Magic and Practical Magic), it still had her signature touch of magic and I absolutely loved it. Hoffman is a magical (pun intended) writer and I have now added her to my Auto-Buy Authors list.

Apocalyptic Fiction:

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 📖 *** After the Flood by: Kassandra Montag (William Morrow) – Pub Date: September 3, 2019

I wasn’t sure how Montag was going to keep my interest for almost 500-pages in a world that was basically flooded, but she did. I was enraptured with the story as well as her writing, and I could not put this one down. I loved the story and the characters so much! This book will be in my Top 10 at the end of the year, I’m sure!

Memoir:

⭐️⭐️⭐️ 📱 Consent: A Memoir of Unwanted Attention by: Donna Freitas (Little Brown) – Pub Date: August 13, 2019

The #metoo movement has brought toxic masculinity to the forefront and I suspect stories like this one will become more and more common. Freitas was stalked by a professor at her college – also a priest – and when she finally reported him to the Human Resources department at her college, she was not believed. Instead, the professor was promoted! Nothing about this is surprising to me – we see it over and over again in the media. That’s what makes stories like these so important – in hopes that they help change the narrative around harassment of any kind towards women.

Thriller: 

⭐️⭐️⭐️💫 📱 Lock Every Door by: Riley Sager (Dutton) – Pub Date: July 2, 2019

I’m not crazy town about Riley Sager. I read Final Girls and thought it was fine, but I actually did enjoy this one. I’ve become a fan of books set in NYC, and I thought the plot of this one was a little better executed. If you need something quick and light, give this one a try!

Cute Romance with Some Substance:

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Red, White, and Royal Blue by: Casey McQuiston (St. Martin’s Griffin) – Pub Date: May 14, 2019

Through Alex and Henry’s love story, we see the world united IN LOVE and I’M HERE FOR IT! 🇺🇸 ❤️💙🇬🇧 I always say that I’m not really a fan of the romance genre, but I now have several go-to recommendations in this category, and this book is certainly one of them!

Don’t Feel Bad for Skipping:

⭐️⭐️⭐️📱 The Day the World Came to Town: 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland by: Jim DeFede (William Morrow) – Pub Date: September 3, 2002

(I’m on a 9/11 kick, if you can’t tell.) I was so curious about this town in Newfoundland that found their town suddenly hosting passengers from America-bound flights that couldn’t land due to the flight restrictions placed shortly after the events of 9/11 started. They graciously hosted almost 7,000 people by opening up their homes, their stores, and their restaurants. They refused to accept any money from the stranded passengers – their only goal was to make them feel safe and as comfortable as they could. I was inspired by their hospitality and it gave me hope that this world isn’t as dark as it can sometimes seem.

⭐️⭐️ 📖 *** Inland by: Téa Obreht (Random House) – Pub Date: August 13, 2019

Still mad I finished this book and didn’t give up sooner. It just lacked any engagement and I was supremely bored the whole time!

⭐️⭐️ 📖 Disappearing Earth by: Julia Phillips (Knopf) – Pub Date: May 14, 2019

Similar to Inland, this one was heavy on descriptions but light on cohesion and interest. It read more like a collection of short stories, but promised to make sense at the end and that really didn’t happen for me.

Not For Me (AKA: DNF):

📖 Call Me By Your Name by: André Aciman (Atlantic Books)

I had such high hopes, but I got lost in the detailed writing. I found myself checking out too much to care.

📱 I Like To Watch: Arguing My Way Through the TV Revolution by: Emily Nussbaum (Random House) – Pub Date: June 25, 2019

If you’re a big TV fanatic (I am not), then I think you’d enjoy this book. I don’t really watch a lot of TV so most of this went right over my head.

📱 *** On the Corner of Love and Hate by: Nina Bocci (Gallery) – Pub Date: August 20, 2019

I don’t know…I just couldn’t get into this one.

📱 If Beale Street Could Talk by: James Baldwin (The Dial Press) – Pub Date: 1974

Another book that I just couldn’t get into. I’m noticing that most of my DNFs are when I’m reading on my Kindle, so I wonder if there’s a correlation.

📱*** On Swift Horses by: Shannon Pufahl (Riverhead) – Pub  Date: November 5, 2019

This book has hope and promise and I may revisit in hard copy someday. But as for now, I couldn’t get into it at all. Just because I love the cover and the premise so much, I forced myself to keep trying, but I’m finally throwing in the towel at 22%.

What was your favorite read in September?

(#partner #freebooks: All books noted by asterisks (***) indicate I received the book for free from the publisher, the author, or another promotional company to review. All opinions are my own.)

Announcing: October #HWRbooks Selection

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Cara Wall’s book, The Dearly Beloved, is everywhere! With themes of faith, family, and finding meaning in our lives, it’s got all the elements of a story that I love.

I’m excited to announce this as my October #HWRbooks read along, and I really hope you’ll be joining me!

I’m going to try something different this month and only have one discussion (at the end of the month – Saturday, October 26 to be more specific). Read at your leisure and join me for our discussion, where you can answer and discuss when it works for you!

Happy Reading!

My Week in Books {9/25/19}

I’m just sitting here wondering if fall is ever going to show up. Last week, we had 3″ of rain in four days and larger than golf ball-sized hail.

THIS IS FALL, COLORADO; NOT SPRING!

For now, I’ll just have to settle for warm fires and cozy blanket reading in my mind. (Also, I’m fully aware that I will be wishing for this exact kind of weather in January. Don’t @ me.)

Anyway, on to books! What have you been reading (and loving) this week?

Last Week’s Reads:Screen Shot 2019-09-25 at 9.28.45 AM

The Institute by: Stephen King (Scribner) – Pub Date: September 10, 2019

I’ve only read a few books by Stephen King, and each one has left me disappointed. I feel like SK spends a lot of time building up to a big reveal, but the climax always falls flat for me. The Institute was no exception. I was intrigued by the synopsis, but it never delivered for me. I personally think SK’s writing is better suited to movies and may need to keep that in mind the next time I think I want to read one of his novels.

Disappearing Earth by: Julia Phillips (Knopf) – Pub Date: May 14, 2019

This was my pick for my monthly read along (#HWRbooks), and if I’m being honest, I HATED it. It totally would have ended up in the DNF pile had I not been hosting the read along. I thought the chapters were boring and confusing; there was an assumption that it would all come together at the end, but for me, it really didn’t. I thought it was poorly executed and was really just a series of short stories that pretending like they were intertwined.

Currently Reading:

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The Most Fun We Ever Had by: Claire Lombardo (Doubleday) – Pub Date: June 25, 2019

I picked this up a few weeks ago and then got sidetracked by other books…but I’m back. I like this one so far. There’s a whole lot of family drama and complicated relationships – all things I LOVE in a novel!

🎧 *** Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee by: Casey Cep (Knopf) – Pub Date: May 7, 2019

I’m just starting Part Two and it is incredibly fascinating! There’s a lot of factual information interspersed between the actual murder story. I really like the narrator as well, which makes it a whole lot easier to listen to!

DNF (aka: Not For Me):Screen Shot 2019-09-25 at 9.34.48 AM

If Beale Street Could Talk by: James Baldwin (The Dial Press) – Pub Date: 1974

I’m sure this book is great, but I just can’t get into it. I picked it up and read to about 10%, put it down for the night, and had to reread that 10% because I hadn’t remember what was going on at all. I finally decided to DNF at 12%.

(#partner #freebooks: All books noted by asterisks (***) indicate I received the book for free from the publisher, the author, or another promotional company to review. All opinions are my own.)

My Week in Books {9/18/19}

(#partner #freebooks: All books noted by asterisks (***) indicate I received the book for free from the publisher, the author, or another promotional company to review. All opinions are my own.)

Library books are taking precedence lately…and it’s killing my September TBR (aka: Hopefuls) and my buddy reads! I don’t really mind because it’s saving me money and I’m using my local library – both wins!

Only one more discussion of The Goldfinch is left! I can’t believe we’ve tackled this tome and lived to tell about it! 😉 The movie adaptation was just released last Friday and if you’ve seen it, I’d love to hear your thoughts (no spoilers, please!). (You can follow the hashtag here: #HWRgoldfinch and follow me on Instagram: @happiestwhenreading)!

Anyway, on to books! What have you been reading (and loving) this week?

Last Week’s Reads:Screen Shot 2019-09-17 at 8.36.58 AM*** The World That We Knew by: Alice Hoffman (Simon & Schuster) – Pub Date: September 24, 2019

To be honest, I’m not sure what I was expecting heading into this book. I’ve read Hoffman’s other books (Practical Magic and The Rules of Magic) and I really enjoyed them. I love how she incorporates a magical element into her stories. While Practical Magic and The Rules of Magic gave me more Holloween/witchy vibes, this book was completely different. Set in WWII, a mother creates a golem (in Jewish legend, it’s a clay figure brought to life through magic) to protect her daughter from the Nazis. I’m already a sucker for books based on the WWII time period, so this was the perfect blend of magical realism and historical fiction. I quickly grew attached to the characters, especially Lea and Ava. Along with other characters (main and secondary), I was even introduced to parts of history I’d never heard about. (Unfortunately, there were parts that felt forced on Hoffman’s part…almost like she digressed from fiction into nonfiction narration, and I didn’t love when this happened.) Overall, I felt like this was a wonderful addition to WWII historical fiction. I’m now adding Hoffman to my autobuy author list because I’ve really enjoyed every book I’ve read by her so far!

Lock Every Door by: Riley Sager (Dutton) – Pub Date: July 2, 2019

I read Final Girls and mostly felt meh about it – the plot and the writing. I dragged my feet picking this one up, but my library hold for it came in so I gave it a try. I’m glad I did…I really enjoyed this one! Ever since visiting New York earlier this year, I’ve really enjoyed books set in NYC. It makes the reading so much more enjoyable. This book was the perfect mini escape for a few days and if you’re looking for something light, try this one out!

*** The Goldfinch by: Donna Tartt (Little Brown) – Pub Date: October 22, 2013

Only one more week left of The Goldfinch for our buddy read (#HWRgoldfinch). I’m curious how this is all going to wrap up. And, if I’m being honest, I’m ready to put this book away. I have never taken so long to read a book! Having said that, the discussions have added so much to my reading and understanding of the book and I have loved every second of it! I can’t wait to see the movie that came out last week!

If you want to get in on the buddy read, find me on Instagram (@happiestwhenreading) You can also find the discussions we’ve had so far here:, Chapters 1-3, Chapters 4Chapters 5-6Chapters 7-9, and Chapter 10, and Chapter 11! Please jump into the conversation!

Consent: A Memoir of Unwanted Attention by: Donna Freitas (Little Brown) – Pub Date: August 13, 2019

The #metoo movement has brought toxic masculinity to the forefront and I suspect stories like this one will become more and more common. I have this conversation with my husband all the time – that life as a woman is very different than it is for a man. When I’m out in public (even with my husband, but especially when I’m not with him), I am constantly aware of my surroundings. Groups of men, men alone, body language, making sure I’m not in a parking lot alone at night, carrying my keys as a weapon as I walk to my car…all of these things I do subconsciously, ALL THE TIME. I have already started conversations with my daughter (11-years-old) about these things and how she HAS TO be aware of her surroundings and to trust her gut always. It’s just the reality of being a woman in a world where men are believed and protected over women.

While that was a little bit of a tangent, it’s relevant to Freitas story and it was what happened to be on my mind the whole time I was reading it. Freitas was stalked by a professor at her college – also a priest – and when she finally reported him to the Human Resources department at her college, she was not believed. Instead, the professor was promoted! Nothing about this is surprising to me – we see it over and over again in the media. That’s what makes stories like these so important – in hopes that they help change the narrative around harassment of any kind towards women.

Currently Reading:Screen Shot 2019-09-17 at 8.41.52 AM

The Most Fun We Ever Had by: Claire Lombardo (Doubleday) – Pub Date: June 25, 2019

Gosh, I put this one on the back burner to catch up on my read alongs. I remember liking the first 100 pages I read and am eager to jump back into this dysfunctional family!

Disappearing Earth by: Julia Phillips (Knopf) – Pub Date: May 14, 2019

This is my pick for my monthly read along (#HWRbooks), and the first section was a total slog. I’m trying to keep an open mind because it’s MY book pick and I don’t want to fail my readers, but this is definitely not a favorite so far.